TYPES OF TREES


TYPES-OF-TREES

 

DOUGLAS-FIR

Douglas Fir
good fragrance; holds blue to dark green; 1” to 1 ½” needles; needles have one of the best aromas among Christmas trees when crushed. The Douglas fir needles radiate in all directions from the branch. When crushed, these needles have a sweet fragrance. They are one of the top major Christmas tree species in the U.S. Named after David Douglas who studied the tree in the 1800’s; good conical shape; can live for a thousand years.

FRASER-FIR

Fraser Fir
dark green, flattened needles; ½ to 1 inch long, dark green on the top and silvery underneath; good needle retention; nice scent; pyramid-shaped strong branches which turn upward. The Fraser fir branches turn slightly upward. They have good form and needle-retention. They are dark blue-green in color. They have a pleasant scent, and excellent shipping characteristics as well. Named for a botanist, John Fraser, who explored the southern Appalachians in the late 1700’s.

GRAND-FIR

Grand Fir
shiny, dark green needles about 1” – 1 ½ “ long; the needles when crushed, give off a citrusy smell. Commonly grows only on the west coast.

NOBLE-FIR

Noble Fir
one inch long, bluish-green needles with a silvery appearance; has short, stiff branches; great for heavier ornaments; keeps well. These needles turn upward, exposing the lower branches. It’s extremely aromatic, and while it is native to the West Coast, it is gaining popularity throughout the U.S. It’s shape is similar to a Douglas fir but with a deeper, richer green. Known for its beauty, the noble fir has a long keep ability, and its stiff branches make it a good tree for heavy ornaments, as well as providing excellent greenery for wreaths and garland.

NORDMANN-FIR

Nordmann Fir

Photo at right. An excellent needle retaining species with soft glossy dark green needles. Nordmann Firs are the preferred Christmas tree of Europeans, with long, full, lush, dark green foliage, similar to a Fraser fir, but soft to the touch and with excellent needle retention.  Nordmann Fir Christmas Trees can reach 60 feet in height with a spread of 25 to 30 feet. Their soft and lustrous black-green needles stem from symmetrically arranged branches, producing the ideal pyramidal specimen for a Christmas tree. Nordmann Firs are also popular as ornamental trees in parks and gardens. This tree is very popular in Great Britain.

Blue Spruce

The blue spruce, also known as the Colorado blue spruce, is loved for its waxy gray-blue needles that tend to curve upwards. Native to the Rocky Mountains of the United States, this spruce tree features dense foliage that grows in a conical shape anywhere up to 75 feet tall. The blue spruce is said to have “the perfect Christmas tree shape.” Fun fact, the blue spruce is the state tree of Colorado.

Concolor Fir

The concolor fir is often referred to as the white fir. It’s known for its flattened, needle-like leaves that are pointed at the tip. When it’s young, the concolor fir features more blue-green colored leaves, but as it gets older the leaves turn into a duller green hue. The concolor fir can grow up to 195 feet tall.

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